Wednesday, November 05, 2014

Goodbye Obama (and good riddance!)

End of the Age of Obama
Posted on Monday, November 3rd, 2014
BY: JAY COST

The end of the Age of Obama. It began with high hopes on a winter’s night in Iowa in 2008 and ended in disappointment on a crisp fall day nearly seven years later.

Sure, the president has another two years in office, but he is now the lamest of lame ducks. He is soon to face a House majority that is one of the most Republican since the 1920s, and a Senate, we hope, about to be taken over by a Republican majority. But more than this, he seems to have no friends, and few allies, on Capitol Hill.

One fact of politics that the president never fully grasped is that Congress, not the White House, is the center of our political system. Sure, the president lives in a fancy house, enjoys a full-time chef, and has “Hail to the Chief” played when he enters a room. But Congress is—as Stanford’s Morris Fiorina once put it—“the keystone of the Washington establishment.”

The Framers gave pride of place to Congress, making it Article I of the Constitution, and were so worried about its potential power they divided it into two. Ideally, the modern president can use his prestige and acumen to lead Congress, but Obama has fallen far from that ideal. He has treated Congress in a supercilious manner, burned his bridges with Republican leaders, and alienated even Democrats.

With nobody to call on Capitol Hill, the president will have lots of free time over the next two years. He might use some of it to ponder this truth: There are no permanent majorities in American politics. For over a decade, Democrats have been salivating at the prospect of demographic changes propelling them to permanent majority status. Obama in particular has been active on this front, and has ruthlessly divided the country along race, gender, and class lines in the hope of speeding this process along.

We are seeing this play out right now. Obama’s coalition in 2008 was relatively large—at 53 percent of the vote—but unstable. In a country as vast and diverse as ours, all such coalitions are bound to be unstable. And what we have seen is Republicans poach a critical mass of the Obama vote away, in 2010 and likely in 2014, to foil his agenda. Just as Madison might have expected.

It is well-known that this president likes to golf and watch hipster favorites like Game of Thrones, so he probably is too busy to read dusty old books about men who lived  long ago. But those who aspire to succeed this sterling mediocrity in the White House would do well to spend their free time a little differently.

We would suggest a careful study of the words and deeds of the Founding generation. There is much to learn from Madison’s complex philosophy, Alexander Hamilton’s innovative economic program, George Washington’s careful and steady management, and Thomas Jefferson’s pragmatic policy of conciliation. Let’s hope our next president grasps that you have to respect our past to lead us effectively into the future.

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